first impression: salvation army boutique in oakdale

I visited the new Salvation Army “boutique” in Oakdale this week. It’s a nice little spot unlike any of the other Salvation Armies in the cities. Layout-wise, it’s akin to a consignment shop, full of antiques, vintage goodies, nice furniture, quality books and vinyl, and fancier clothes. And, as you’ve probably already guessed, the price points are substantially higher than at the other Sal Vals around town. Here are some peeks from the shop.

Even though the prices on the high side, I still found some deals as everything with a tan tag was 50% off the day of my visit. I came home with a haul that included a ton of awesome jewelry, a never-worn pair of Etienne Aigner peep-toe pumps, some rad coffee table books, a gorgeous prom dress from the ’50s and a hand-knit throw. Among other things, to be blogged about later.

Anyway, if you’re over that way, I’d recommend checking it out!

Salvation Army Boutique
Address: 6060 50th Street North, Oakdale
Phone: 651.773.1365
Hours: Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m., closed on Sundays
FYI: Credit cards are accepted, personal checks are not.

xo,

Meghan

 

store review: hidden treasures thrift store

Hidden Treasures Thrift Store

Overall, this strip mall shop falls into the category of stores I’ll visit if I’m in the area and have a minute, but rarely do I make a trip solely there to thrift. It’s a decent place, don’t get me wrong, but I’m usually looking for clothes, and after many a visit to Hidden Treasures, I’ve yet to buy anything for my closet or my feet. I have, however, seen super deals on furniture ($3 for a solid wooden coffee table! A huge, huge mid-century desk for $9!) and think they have a stand-up collection of dishes and housewares. They frequently have sales (this week, for example, you can save 50 percent on all winter coats, hats, mittens and boots) and every week, they have a special silent auction that frequently features antiques and valuable electronics. The money raised here goes to support a handful of good causes including Masterworks of Minnesota,  Care of Creation and The Garden of Hope.

Here are a couple goodies I’ve found at Hidden Treasures…

Top to bottom: An sweet brass deer ($2), Catalougue, A Book of Cat Names (50 cents) and the prettiest butterfly potholder I ever did see ($1).

Go here to find: Vintage dishes, books, serviceable kitchen utensils, crazy affordable furniture

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥

Do they take credit cards? Yep!

Other helpful hints: Sign up for their e-newsletter and be the first to know about sales and special events.

While you’re there: Admire the strip mall! It was, after all, the first one built in Minnesota, owned and financed by the famed Batista family. Yes, the Cuban Basitstas. Like the folks who ran Cuba before Castro took over. Once you’re done, eat at Dairy Queen, return some books to the library, pick up some chai at Tea Source or fancy olive oil at Annona Gourmet.

Where it is: St. Anthony Village Shopping Center, 2915 Pentagon Drive, St. Anthony

Hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Contact: 612.706.3223, http://www.hiddentreasuresonline.org

Happy shopping!

xo,

Meghan

store review: unique thrift store in st. paul

Unique Thrift Store, St. Paul

WHAT’S GOOD

Purses: Most every Unique, this one included, have heaps and heaps of purses and bags. You can almost always  find an old worn-in Coach satchel or bag there, too, priced, on average, between $15-20.

Vintage clothes: Vintage clothes are separated out from the rest of the clothing and given their own section in both the men’s and women’s areas. I’ve found some really cute pieces at this Unique—skirts, cardigans, shoes, coats. It’ll also be worth your while to peruse the non-vintage clothing, as many times I stumble upon a darling piece from the ’60s that just wasn’t ID’d as vintage.

Jewelry: Like the Unique in North Minneapolis, this one, too has a big selection of jewelry. I always find something I want to take home here—a couple weeks ago I got a turquoise and silver feather ring for $14.

Vintage vinyl: Up front near the check-out is a box of vintage records. I know nothing about record collecting, but there looked to be some nice quality albums in there, starting at $3.

WHAT’S NOT GOOD

House wares: For such a big store, I hardly ever find housewares or Pyrex to come home with me. They do have a  lot of utilitarian stuff—pots, pans, bags of silverware—if you need kitchen basics for cheap.

Furniture: Slim pickins. Enough said!

Here are a couple of my favorite finds from past trips to this Unique…

Brand new Minnetonka moccasins, size 8.5…


Impeccable white and gray Jordache faux fur coat…

Aforementioned sterling silver and turquoise ring…


IN SUM

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥

Do they take credit cards? Yep! They do not, however, accept checks.

Will they accept returns or exchanges? No. Trust me, I tried once. Not a fun experience.

Other helpful hints: You NEED one of these.

This handy little card will net you 25 percent off every single Friday. Sweet, right? You’ll also receive coupons ($10 off sometimes!) and alerts regarding sales, via email. Sign up (it’s free!) at the front of the store.

Where it is: 1657 Rice Street, Saint Paul (corner of Rice and Larpenteur)

Hours: Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Contact: 651.489.5083

I hope you all have had lovely Wednesdays! I’m off to do a walk-through of a potential venue for the December Mighty Swell sale, and then check out the newly remodeled Stastiu’s, now known as Stanley’s Northeast Bar Room, with the very lovely Angie.

xxoo,

Meghan

store review: savers on lake street

Savers Thrift Store, Lake Street, Minneapolis

I have a love-hate relationship with Savers thrift stores. I love that they have high standards for quality, and that the stores are clean and open on Sundays. But it drives me up the wall that their prices are ridiculously high. This Savers, the only one in Minneapolis proper, has been a go-to thrifting spot for me for years, so I figured I’d tell you all a little about it, and some tricks for saving even more money there.

WHAT’S GOOD

Vintage clothes: Unlike some of the other Savers, this one has a whole section devoted to vintage in the middle of the store, with men’s and women’s wear mixed in together. I’ve found some really bitchin’ dresses from the ’70s-’90, 1960s wool skirts and men’s button-downs. Prices are fair, with dresses running anywhere in between $4-12, skirt for $6-8 and blouses for $5 here.

Books: Taking up a good portion of the store is an assortment of well-sorted and in-good-condition books. I’ve spotted some really nice art/coffee table-type tomes, too.

House wares: This Savers is in many ways my Target alternative, when it comes to household necessities. It’s easy to pop in here to see if they have a casserole dish in the size I need, or a baking pan—usually there’s something here that will work. I’ve also found really nice decorative plates here, and little vases to add to my collection.

WHAT’S NOT GOOD

New clothes: A lot of the store’s clothing is newer, cheap clothes (Target brands, Old Navy), marked stupidly high, especially considering they’re used.

Picked over-ness: Since this Savers is close to a light rail stop and right in the middle of town, it can be crazily picked over, especially if you stop in later in the afternoon or evening or during sale days.

Where does the money raised here go? Into some rich folks’ pockets! Savers is a for-profit thrift store, and it is privately owned and operated. They do work with local nonprofits, however, which can lead to some confusion, with shoppers thinking what they spend at Savers is going solely to support philanthropic efforts. It works like this: The selected nonprofits will solicit donations from folks like you and me, and then turn over those donations to Savers, who in turn, pays them per bag or box of merchandise. Donations are then sorted by Savers staff. What’s not deemed acceptable for sale in their stores is then resold (and sometimes donated) to retailers in developing countries. So, Savers not only makes money from what they sell in their retail stores, but also by selling unwanted merchandise they got for free to other retailers.

According to their website, since 1954, Savers has paid more than $1 billion to fund nonprofits’ programs and services. And that is nothing to sniff at. You can learn more about the company here.

Here are some of my favorite finds from this shop:

I love this dress! The super faded floral print is sweet, and it has pockets, a flattering cut and lady-like length. It has this soft sheen, too, which I love. I believe it was $3.99 and it came with a matching belt.

This plate makes me so happy. Now, where to hang it?

I can’t take these leather kitten-heeled, wooden-soled beauties off! Check out the bows! They cost $4 (originally priced $8, but bought on a half-off day).

Go here to find: Vintage clothes, good quality housewares, nice used books

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Do they take credit cards? Yep!

Will they accept returns or exchanges? Yes, you can exchange items within seven days of purchase but only with a receipt and the tags still attached.

Other helpful hints: Click here to sign up for Savers’ e-newsletter. You’ll get advance notice of special sales and coupons. Sweet right? If you’re a  college student, or still have your ID, flash it on Wednesdays and take 50 percent off your entire purchase. Also keep an eye out for a calendar (usually found by the register) that lists the sales happening that month and any other special promo days (senior citizen discount days, for example).

While you’re there: On Tuesdays, from 3-7 p.m., and on Saturdays, from 8 a.m.- 1 p.m.,  hop across the street to the Midtown Farmers’ Market. If I’m famished after thrifting on a Tuesday after work, I stop and pick some yummy takeout from one of the food vendors or some veggies. Or, if you’re like my boyfriend, you can drop $5 and get a piping hot pizza at Little Caesars, which is in the same strip mall at Savers. Aldi, Wells Fargo, Family Dollar,  a barber shop and a liquor store all have a spot there, too.

Where it is: 2124 East Lake St, Minneapolis

Hours: Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Contact: 612.729.9271, www.savers.org

Happy Friday, everyone! I’m so stoked for another long weekend. Two in a row! How lucky can one girl be??

xxoo,

Meghan

store review: bibles for missions thrift center

Bibles for Missions Thrift Center

Getting tipped-off to new thrift stores excites me in a characteristically nerdy way, especially when the tip comes from comes from someone as thrift-savvy as my momma. So, several months ago, when she called to tell me that Esther Johnson, my cinnamon-scented pseudo-grandma, had donated all of her household goods to Bibles for Missions, I knew it was a place worth investigating. If it passed Esther’s muster, I was all in.

After several visits, I can say that Bibles for Missions does officially rock in some areas, and is kind of meh in others.

WHAT’S GOOD

Furniture: While many thrift-store furniture sections make me say “yuck,” Bibles for Missions consistently has a quality assortment of couches, love seats, dressers, desks, chairs—you name it—with most all of it in superior shape. One of my biggest regrets was not snapping up this luscious, ultra-comfy, watercolor-floral printed ’60s-era sofa. I believe it was priced at $30.  I also believe that I am kicking myself still.

House wares: Taking up a good half of the store is an assortment of well-sorted and reasonably priced housewares.

Frames: There’s an entire room devoted to framed art and empty frames. The art, for the most part, sucks, but the majority of frames are in great shape.

WHAT’S MEH

Clothes: Small selection of mostly frumpy junk. Prices are reasonable though.

Shoes: Again, the selection is too small and it’s usually crap.

Where does the money raised here go? To buy Bibles, of course! Specifically, Bibles for Bulgaria. One of 14 centers scattered throughout the country, Bibles for Missions is partnered with the Bible League International, an organization that “strategically places Scripture through small group Bible studies” rather than random, wasteful Bible dumps. As of 2006, the organization has provided more than 712 million Bibles in 60+ countries.

Here are some of my favorite finds from this shop:

The filtered water at my office is all the way upstairs. Which makes this handy carafe my desk-top lifesaver. Don’t you just love yellow and blue together??? I think this was $2. Maybe $3?
A massive amount of vintage doilies, to be used in a purty DIY to be posted later this week. Prices on these ranged from 39 cents to $1.29.
A perfectly aged, framed Eiffel Tower snapshot for 79 cents? Yes please!

Go here to find: Furniture, picture/photo frames, housewares, linens, books

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Do they take credit cards? Yep!

While you’re there: Hop on over to Unique Thrift Store. Go east on 36th Avenue for a few minutes and then turn left at Winnetka Avenue. (The exact address is 4471 Winnetka Avenue North.) Head south on Winnetka to get to ARC Value Village (2751 Winnetka Avenue). Thrifting trifecta!! Win!!!

Where it is: 4713 North 36th Avenue, Crystal

Hours: Mon., Tues., Wed. and Friday : 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Thursday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Contact: 763.522.1786, www.biblesformissions.org

I’m off to get cleaned up before date night with my honey. We’re going to make Jucy Lucys at home, with real Velveeta and everything. I’m so excited!!

xxxo,

Meghan

store review: animal ark thrift store

Animal Ark Thrift Store

I know, I know, a thrift store in St. Paul? Where the hell is that?? Typically the only things that can get me over that way is a visit with my Auntie Sharyn who lives in Lowertown or a hot date with my honey at Mancini’s. This thrift however, has entered into that good company, quickly becoming something else worth crossing the river for. Because, you see, this is a big thrift store that can house some pretty fantastic finds.

Situated at the top of a long hill in the adorably named neighborhood of Swede Hollow, the biggest strength of this place lies in the housewares section. If you’re looking to outfit a kitchen, top to bottom, with mostly vintage or quality used stuff, this is where I’d send you. (Big brother are you reading?? Get a colander already dude!) The entire left side of the store is essentially just household goods. Pass by the fancy sets of china displayed out front, there are plenty of deals to be had once you start digging an aisle or two back. There’s a lot to look at, so take your time. Some things you can reliably find here: an assortment of old salt and pepper sets, decanters, beautiful cake stands, vintage stemware, kitschy cookbooks and service items, all reasonably priced.

Note: The staff works the Internet to research prices, especially on the china and dishes. It’s not unusual to stumble across some pieces that are marked pretty high—whole sets of china for $150, for example—with the eBay summary taped to the shelf underneath.

Moving on…I can’t say I know very much about vinyl, but they sure seem to have a lot, and every record is $1. The stacks are stashed in the back room, which also has all the men’s clothes, lighting, gardening stuff, some furniture and electronics, all of which they have a healthy selection of.

In terms of clothes, you’ll have to go often to score anything remarkable. Some of my favorite things I’ve picked up here wardrobe-wise are some leather Brazilian-made clogs and this sporty Lee denim jacket I’m in love with. You can rely on variety of costume-y, grandma-like jewelry—think lots of beads, clip-on earrings, cuff bracelets, fake gold, belt buckles, etc. Scarves and hankies are also had aplenty.

The furniture displayed is in good shape with inoffensive, serviceable designs. I’d say it’s priced fairly, but not cheaply. A woman working there mentioned a whole ‘nother space adjacent to the shop, that’s chockful of furniture that you can get escorted to and browse, if furniture is what you’re seeking. Of course she told me this on my way out the door, so I can’t tell you first-hand what’s back over there. Good to know, though, right?

Sale-wise, every time I’ve visited, art’s been 50 percent off. While the majority consists of cheesy prints, I’ve found some charming crewel and cross-stitched pieces as well as some frames that would be worth shelling out a buck or two for. All brown dishes (covered crocks and company) always seem to be 50 percent off, too. I haven’t noticed across-the-board discounts on clothing, but they do put stuff on sale when the seasons change.

The service here is the only things I can complain about, because, it wasn’t the best the last time I was there. The lady was curt, and honest to goodness, I felt like I ruined her entire morning by asking her to ring me up. She didn’t include part of my purchase, meaning she had to run my card twice. I might as well have kicked her in the shins, it was that painful for her. Everyone has tough days, but c’mon…be nice! She was a volunteer, too, which made her sour ‘tude even more inexplicable. It’s volunteer work, not work work. Be pumped!

Where does the money raised here go? According to Animal Ark’s website, the shop generates approximately $60,000 a year for the shelter, the animals and their care. As Minnesota’s largest no-kill shelter, Animal Ark serves more than 1,000 homeless animals every year in their Hastings shelter and through their network of foster homes. The fact that the “rabbits are kept in a luxury bunny suite that includes all the amenities a house rabbit deserves,” makes my heart happy. Bunny suites for the house rabbits—for cute’s sake! If you’re considering adopting a dog or cat (or rabbit, I suppose), I dare you spend a few minutes on their site and not fall head-over-heels in love with one of the many eligible furballs.

To me, they’re a worthy organization and I’m 100-percent content to have my thrifting dollars support their mission.

Here are some of my favorite finds from this shop:

Go here to find: Dishes, kitchen utensils, vintage sheets, jewelry, pet supplies, kitschy art, furniture (dining tables, especially)

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Do they take credit cards? Yep! (They also sell pet licenses for St. Paul pooches and kitty cats.)

While you’re there: Um, well, let me preface this by saying I know next to nothing about St. Paul, BUT, when Mary and I were there last Saturday, we stopped at Swede Hollow Cafe and dang, everything looked awesome. Half the place was digging into caramel rolls the size of a baby’s head, and they also had a decent sammy selection. I had a cubano (fancy term for coffee with milk and brown sugar–news to me, too) and it was sufficiently hot, sugary and caffeinated.

Where it is:809 E. 7th Street, St. Paul

Hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Contact: 651.772.8983, www.animalarkshelter.org

I’ve been a bad blogger, and for that, I am sorry. I had a big presentation at work this morning, and it’s been taking up a lot of energy. Other things that have been keeping me busy? Early a.m. yoga at the Guthrie, seeing these two bands last night at First Avenue, eating obscene amounts of soul food from this place, research disguised as shopping for the June issue of METRO magazine and as usual, dog walking, chores and a healthy dose of goofing off.

Tonight’s plans revolve around putting away some nachos (and a Pacifico or two) with a couple delightful ladies, a weekly tradition I’m fairly obsessed with.  I’m trying a shrimp nacho recipe—I could eat both nachos and shrimps everyday of my life and be happy, but I’m not 100-percent sure I’ll love them together.  [Update: I totally did! These turned out super yummy.] If I can manage to avoid splashing any more pineapple juice onto my just-washed bangs like I did a minute ago, we should be in OK shape. Back to the kitchen I go…

xoxo,

Meghan

thrift store review: nicollet avenue salvation army

Nicollet Avenue Salvation Army Thrift Store

I find myself at this Salvation Army more than any other in the Twin Cities solely because the travel time from when I turn the lock in my back door to arriving at the store’s front door is approximately three minutes. When I need a quick thrifting fix, as I frequently do, but don’t have a lot of time, also an all-too-often occurrence, this is my spot.

I go here for the basics—clothes hangers (5 for $1), bed frames ($15 for a twin frame for my guest room)—and keep my expectations for finding anything else low. I browse the clothes, jewelry, dishes and bric-brac, but rarely find anything too exciting. Like most other area Salvation Army thrifts, this store stocks a moderate amount of never-been-worn Merona, Xhilaration, Converse One Star and Liz Lange, i.e. Target store brands.

The service is standard, but there’s a lovely new woman who started in the past month, who I’ve found to be very sweet and helpful. In terms of sales, every Friday and Saturday, the store offers dollar days, when all clothing with the weekly tag sale color are $1 each. (Offer does not include shoes or accessories.)

Here’s one of my favorite finds from this shop. Boy did I wear the crap out of this poncho this winter! It’s so warm and I love the rounded brass buttons. Pictured in it is the lovely Mary. She was over one night, got cold, threw it on and then, busted a move. Which of course, I had to document. I think I paid $3.99 for this fringed green and gold beauty.

Vintage Wool Poncho

Go here to find: Your thrift-store basics. Serviceable kitchen goods, sometimes decent furniture, average clothing and shoes. I recall that they had a healthy selection of Christmas items, both new and vintage. They also seem to keep a nice stock of bicycles, both for children and adults, many of them of the older, awesome variety.

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥

Do they take credit cards? Yep!

While you’re there: In terms of dining, Shorty & Wag’s is across the street and Cocina Latina is next door. Anodyne Coffeehouse is also a hop-and-a-skip south on Nicollet. Drinking wise, you could go to Casey’s. We are talking about south, meaning it’s a beer bar. They have fancy stuff on tap, but Casey’s is not for me, ’cause I can’t stomach beer out of plastic bottles, unless I’m on a boat. In which case, I don’t care, because I’m probably exceptionally happy. Because I’m on a boat.

Shopping-wise, B Squad Vintage is a scant three blocks north up Nicollet, if you feel like shelling out a few more Jacksons for your vintage goodies. This store perpetually stocked with lovely vintage finds, including a reliable selection of dresses, vinyl, T-shirts, et al.

Where it is: 3740 Nicollet Avenue, Minneapolis

Hours: Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Contact: 612.822.1200

I hope your Tuesday has treated you well. I’m not sure if it was the 3 a.m. thunder or my late afternoon Doubleshot that kept me up last night, but I most definitely didn’t get enough sleep. (Since when I can I not drink coffee past 4 p.m., btw?) Tonight’s plans include [drumroll please] cleaning out my fridge, putting away laundry (story of my life) and paying some bills. I know, I know, so rock ‘n’ roll.

Speaking of that, I melt for this rehearsal take of “If Not For You.” It’s not George’s beard or Bob’s denim-on-denim ‘fit (both are awesome), but it’s just the sweetest little song. And, I’m a sucker for outtakes, B-sides and rehearsal footage of any kind. Anyway, watch & melt. Unless, you know, you have no heart.

xoxo,

Meghan

store review: bethesda dress for less thrift store

Bethesda Dress for Less Thrift Store

Tucked into one of Maplewood’s many strip malls (the Hafner Centre, to be exact), this store is a little gem. While the majority of the clothing trends towards modern stuff with heavy dose of suburban mom flavor,  it’s often peppered with ’60s- and ’70s-era vintage—teases that will keep you visiting week after week.

To keep merchandise moving, special savings are a daily occurrence—all items with a certain color tag are 50 percent off, or, if you’re lucky as I was one recent Saturday, $1.  I walked skipped out of the store with a garbage bag full of treasures, all for $20. Don’t miss the grocery cart of half-off merchandise found next to the register, too. I’ve found some beautiful ’60s-era tablecloths and cute old scarves in there for song.

In terms of service, the lovely ladies—all volunteers!—who run this shop couldn’t be sweeter. It’s the place to thrift if you miss your grandmas, as I do frequently. They start chatting about their replaced hips and water aerobics classes and boy oh boy, I eat it up. One hundred percent of the profits from Bethesda’s thrifts support Bethesda Lutheran Communities. According to the charity’s website, in 2008, the shops provided $1.2 million that helped pay for specially built wheelchairs, dentures, supplies for feeding tubes and for Christian education and “spiritual nurture” for the folks served by the organization. I don’t know what “spiritual nurture” means exactly, but if shopping there helps put teeth in a toothless mouth, I’m all about it. I’m biased towards non-profit thrifts, as you’ll find out.

Some of my favorite finds from this shop:

Sears Donut Machine

Sears Donut Machine-$2.50

1950s-era lacy blue garter belt-$2.49

Victorian-ish leather lace-up boots, $1.50

I’ve also scored unbelievable deals on vintage coats here. My favorite is a stunning green bouclé wool beauty with original buttons and mink collar. With an $8 price tag, I couldn’t pass it up. Other good finds include a two-piece wool suit from the ’60s ($1), an awesome striped ’80s-era shirt dress ($4.99), countless blouses ($1-4.99), cute brooches ($2.99)…I could go on.

Go here to find: vintage coats and blouses, impeccable table linens, scarves, fabric remnants, cookbooks, awesome old sewing patterns, never-used vintage stockings

Selection/Variety: ♥ ♥ ♥

Quality: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Pricing: ♥ ♥ ♥

Organization: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Customer service: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Cleanliness: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

While you’re there: You mean besides hitting up the Dairy Queen across the street? Okay fine. The sign advertising the $1.50 burger at Bleecher’s Bar & Grill tempts me, but I haven’t been brave enough to give it a go. Has anyone eaten there? One of these Saturdays, when the burger bug bites, I’ll give it a try.

Anyway, if you’re wanting to maximize your thrifting excursion, make a quick stop at ARC Value Village or Goodwill. They sit like two ducks in a row on your way from Highway 36 to the Bethesda shop.  Head north on White Bear Avenue towards Highway 36 and they’ll both be on your right.

Where it is: 1550 White Bear Ave. N., St. Paul, MN 55106

Hours: Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Contact: 651.793.6352

I’m working hard on a handy how-to, coming up soon!

xoxo,

Meghan