pro tips for surviving super sale days

Hitting up the super sale days at thrift stores comes at a price. The odds that the stores will be overrun with fellow bargain hunters are great, and without proper preparation, you might go a little bonkers. (Goodness knows I sometimes do, and I thrift all the freakin’ time.) So, if you’re planning on hitting up any of the 4th of July sales this weekend (here’s my round-up), here are some awesome tips from experienced friends of mine you might helpful.

RAE SAYS…

1. Bring beverages! I start my morning with plenty of coffee and bring along a water bottle. Hydration is important.

2. People get super aggressive on sale days—don’t let rude people bum you out! Be prepared with an arsenal of smiles and “excuse me’s.”

3. If you can avoid a cart, do it. Trying to maneuver your cart through crazy people, stray children and thrift-store employees can be a drag.

4. Focus! This may not be the best day to peruse every section… stick to what you are really looking for and bee line for that area of the store first.

HOLLY SAYS…

1. Know what you are getting yourself into. Think Black Friday openers for the newest toy fad plus people who are even more into deals than the average shopper. This makes for an intense bunch of rabid treasure hunters. As I see it, you have two choices—to embrace the crazy and become one yourself OR attempt to float above it all, untouched by the seething anger that tends to erupt when you find yourself fighting over a treasure with another, less enlightened shopper. If you take the latter route, do some meditation in your car before entering the store.

2. Watch out for small children. Despite store’s best intentions with their loudspeaker reminders that your children must be by you at all times, mega sales at thrift stores tend to be crawling with unattended children. You will feel really bad if you accidentally hit one with your cart, even if it is their fault.

3. Keep an eye out for potential competitors. Thrifting brings together people from all walks of life. Upon entering the store, and during your shopping time, look for people who look like they have similar tastes as you. Hit the sections they aren’t in, before they can get to them Note: this sort of action is fitting if you are taking the “embrace the crazy” mindset described in tip. No. 1.

4. Don’t allow yourself to be blinded by deals. Mega deals tend to warp the brain, causing thrifting judgment to go out the window—when deciding on your final items, resist the tendency to buy whatever you have gotten your paws on and ask yourself if you really, truly want/can’t live without the item in question.

5. Have patience. If you hit up a sale later in the day, chances are items will be rather picked over. The plus side to this is that you can shop in a less intense environment. No matter what, don’t give up—I once unknowningly stumbled upon a 50% off sale at Value Village to be sorely disappointed, that is, until I found one of the most amazing/strangest pieces I have found thrifting—a business casual drunk Mickey Mouse short-sleeved sweatshirt style t-shirt. Had I given up after the first twenty minutes, I would have never found this gem.

ROSE SAYS…

1. Be kind to your fellow thrifters. It can get pretty nutso in there and sometimes the worst of human nature comes out while wrestling for a deal. Just remember that you are all in it together, equally gripped by what I like to call the thrift “fever.” Don’t forget to smile, move your cart out of the way and congratulate someone else on their great find (even if it makes you green with envy).

2. Get there early…or get there late. As with most big sales, the early bird gets the worm. However, there is something to be said for taking it easy, enjoying a leisurely brunch and arriving later in the day once the frenzy has died down. You can browse more thoroughly and calmly. And remember, not everybody is looking for the same things you are and they have probably left some great treasures behind.

3. Hit the road, Jack. The thrift store right down the road is easy pickings for everybody in your hood. If you’ve got the time, pack the cooler and hit the way out-of-the way spots on the edge of town and beyond.

4. Hydrate. Thrifting is a competitive sport after all and summer is in full swing.

JILL SAYS…

1.  Don’t bother with a cart. Make a couple trips out to the car if need be, but a cart is just going to slow you down…and every other shopper too.

2.  Wear light layers (skirt + legging + t-shirt) for quick, easy, and perhaps public try-ons. Comfy shoes are a must. A hands-free purse is also a must.

3.  Relax and have fun. The environment can get a bit tense and over-stimulating. Mentally prepare for the crowds, the unintentional bumps and shoves, the waiting, the dodging, the body heat.

4.  Be polite.  Smile at your fellow-thrifter.  No need to be rude over saving a few bucks.

5.  Watch your stuff!  IF you do choose to take a cart, beware of those around you who might snag an item…or worse —your wallet!

WHAT I SAY…

1. Before I go, I think about the worst-case scenario—packed aisles, screaming children, pushy people, picked-over racks, no good finds. If I’m still psyched to thrift, I’ll go. If, after mulling it over and I’m not up for it, I don’t leave the house. I have gone to crazy sale days when I’m not feeling it and have never, ever, ever had a good time.

2. Unlike some of the gals above, I always grab a cart, because I know there’s a good chance I’m going to load it to the gills. There’s also been plenty of times I’ve almost had my arm fall off from trying to carry an insane amount of clothes without a cart. If you do choose to get a cart, mind that sucker! Don’t leave it in the middle of a crowded aisle to go find your friend, don’t block peoples’ way or hurry them along pushing the cart at their ankles—all of that sh*t is annoying. If you wind up in someone’s way (you will!), smile and politely move. Respect your elders and moms with kids.

3. Pull everything that catches your eye and put in your cart. Even if you don’t plan on buying it, there’s no harm in pushing it around and thinking it over. Sale days are not the time to leave something on the rack you’re on the fence about, unless of course you feel like having your heart broken. Before you check out, go through everything you’ve pulled and sort through it (in an out-of-the-way corner).

4. After I’ve hit up my must-shop sections (vintage, dresses, purses, shoes, housewares, art work) and feel like I’m almost ready to go, I make a round of the entire store, paying attention to the racks near the mirrors and dressing rooms. I can’t tell you how many gems I’ve found in odd places due to people having second thoughts or finding stuff doesn’t fit. Also keep an eye out for staff restocking the racks. In sum, keep your eyes open all the time!

5. My final word of advice: Pushiness is a highly unattractive trait; one that’s exhibited far too frequently on sale days. As someone who literally thrifts for a living, take it from me: There’s not a dress, purse or paint-by-number on earth that’s worth acting undignified over. When you see someone who’s scored big, smile, compliment their finds and go home knowing that your day will come.

A huge thank you to Rae, Lisa, Rose and Jill for sharing your hard-earned pearls of wisdom! I <3 you girls!

Have great holiday weekends all…

xo,

Meghan

7 thoughts on “pro tips for surviving super sale days

  1. Pingback: Lovely Links: 7/8/11

  2. Pingback: labor day sales roundup « high plains thrifter

  3. I thirft in Minneapolis myself and have a totally different theory about thrifting. Sale or no sale. My body looks normal but the vast majority of clothes aren’t for me, they do not fit. I’m also picky about fabric and color. But I ALWAYS walk out the door with way too many pieces that look awesome on me.

    Why? I thrift because the random variety that thrift stores carry is better than anything any store can regularly stock as they’re aiming for more than one size of each item. So statistically speaking I’m better off at a thrift store. Each woman’s body is different, as are her tastes, her missing bits in her wardrobe etc. etc.

    There are 20 good pieces in each thrift store for each woman who walks in the front door on a sale day. Whether or not she takes the time to find all 20 pieces is another matter alltogether. In other words, that perfect shirt will be passed over by 200 people before I get there because it’s not perfect for them but is for me. Therefore no rush, the right clothes will be there when I get to that part of the rack. And if they’re not, well then, I just need to go to the other two or three thrift stores on my list ;)

  4. Pingback: heads up: memorial day thrift store sales | high plains thrifter

  5. I recall shopping on a sale day years ago at a thrift store in Racine WI. One of the shoppers used gassy farting to clear people from an area. Though i have never used the technique myself, it is highly effective and over the years the idea has crossed my mind when i am at a madhouse of a sale, and its so crowded i can barely maneuver.

  6. Pingback: Thrift around : savvy.mn

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